Category Archives: Molecular Gastronomy

Ask Nina Rose – What is Spherification?

nina-rose_01It’s Molecular March here at Fante’s!  This week we’ve asked Nina Rose to give a little background on Spherification. 

Frozen Reverse SpherificationAside from foams, one of the most popular and well-known textures used in molecular gastronomy and modernist cuisine are spheres.

To be more specific, a sphere comprised of a thin, jellied outer membrane with a liquid center that pops in your mouth when eaten. Sometimes these spheres can be called different names depending on their size and shape, from tiny “caviar” or “pearls” to large “ravioli” or “eggs.”

The method of creating these forms is called spherification (or reverse spherification, but I’ll get to that later).

So what is spherification? Continue reading

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Molecular March: That’s a Wrap

What a month! We spent March showing you how to use Molecular Gastronomy techniques to enhance the flavors and textures of your dishes. From foams to gels to the Sous Vide, there area wealth of options for the experimental chef. We ushered in the month with a fantastic demo by the people from Culinary Imports, who showed us the tip of the molecular gastronomy iceberg. We snapped some interesting and fun photos from that first week, and wanted to share a few here.

For all the ingredients used in these demos, check out our Molecular Gastronomy page.

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Are You Gellin’?

AgazoonThe bedrock of Molecular Gastronomy is the idea that you can re-engineer dishes into something new and fun in taste and texture – a sort of Alice in Wonderland meets Bill Nye the Science Guy meets Emeril. One of the best examples is in creating gels with AgaZoon, our feature this week as Molecular March continues.

Creating gels isn’t necessarily new; in fact, some place its origins as far back as 17th Century Kyoto, when Tarozaemon Minoya observed a dish made of “boiled seaweed left to freeze and thaw several times formed a substance presenting gelling ability.” Current applications are far-reaching – apart from the classic Jell-O dessert, we were able to make Concord grape “pasta” earlier this week. Working with a product like AgaZoon requires simple ingredients and a keen eye (the mixture must reach a boiling point, then be immersed in an ice water bath to set to produce the transformation.).  Many recipes simply call for a liquid and AgaZoon (and the above-mentioned hot/cold manipulation) to produce gels.  So just what is AgaZoon?

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